Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Open Source’

Subversion, Apache Server, Subclipse installation & configuration

May 24, 2010 1 comment

 

Ever wanted to have a code repository of your own? Either working on a small project or working with your friends on the next big thing, it would be great to have a repository where you can maintain your code, just as you would while working at your office. Lot of you might have been using version controls at workplaces such as CVS, VSS etc. Many will have an urge to maintain their homework using a version control mechanism. But is it all that easy? Well, it isn’t a one-go shot for a starter. Here is this post throwing light on how precisely to do that.

For beginners, probably the only thing relatable is the name of the version control alone, but how to get it, how to install it, how to configure it and then how to use it, will all be things to follow. There are many open-source free version controls available, do explore their features and chose the one best for you. This post though specifically guides your way through installing and configuring Subversion. Before reading the rest of the post, it would be helpful to get into a primer about subversion / subversion client / using subversion locally/ using subversion remotely etc. For a comprehensive look into subversion, read it hereSubversion  is a small and simple enough version control to run on a development machine to give a full-fledged source code control. You can get down and dirty by manually installing and configuring subversion like many others who have shed enough time doing it manually starting with downloading subversion here.

 

Manual Download/Installation/Configuration of subversion:

Here are the list of few links that should help get started with manually installing and configuring subversion:

Read more…

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Why MySQL?

September 15, 2009 Leave a comment

 

 

Graveled at commercial software licensing? Are you looking for a stable database platform but sweating at the hefty price tags attached to mainstream products from Microsoft, Oracle and other vendors? MySQL may be for you!  MySQL is a well-respected product that is more than capable of commercial operation. As of April 2009, MySQL offers MySQL 5.1 in two different variants: the MySQL Community Server and Enterprise Server, both having common code base and include the below features.

 

MySQL Features:

  • A broad subset of ANSI SQL 99, as well as extensions.
  • Cross-platform support.
  • Stored procedures.
  • Triggers.
  • Cursors.
  • Updatable Views.
  • True Varchar support.
  • INFORMATION_SCHEMA.
  • Strict mode.
  • X/Open XA distributed transaction processing (DTP) support; two phase commit as part of this, using Oracle’s InnoDB engine.
  • Independent storage engines (MyISAM for read speed, InnoDB for transactions and referential integrity, MySQL Archive for storing historical data in little space).
  • Transactions with the InnoDB, BDB and Cluster storage engines; savepoints with InnoDB.
  • SSL support.
  • Query caching.
  • Sub-SELECTs (i.e. nested SELECTs).
  • Replication with one master per slave, many slaves per master, no automatic support for multiple masters per slave.
  • Full-text indexing and searching using MyISAM engine.
  • Embedded database library.
  • Partial Unicode support (UTF-8 sequences longer than 3 bytes are not supported; UCS-2 encoded strings are also limited to the BMP).
  • Partial ACID compliance (full compliance only when using the non-default storage engines InnoDB, BDB and Cluster).
  • Shared-nothing clustering through MySQL Cluster

MySQL Enterprise Server is released once per month and the sources can be obtained either from MySQL’s customer-only Enterprise site or from MySQL’s Bazaar repository, both under the GPL license. The MySQL Community Server is published on an unspecified schedule under the GPL and contains all bug fixes that were shipped with the last MySQL Enterprise Server release. Binaries are no longer provided by MySQL for every release of the Community Server. Read more…

Why Eclipse IDE?

September 13, 2009 Leave a comment

 

 

If you’re reading this, you’re most likely a Java programmer, and you know how finicky Java can be at times. Missed import statements, forgotten variable declarations, omitted semicolons, garbled syntax, typos—all these problems will cause the Java command-line compiler, javac, to cough and display pages of annoying error messages. The error messages tell you that javac knows what the error is but doesn’t fix the problem. javac can’t fix the problem as it isn’t an editor. That makes long streams of errors scrolling off the page an all-too-common experience for Java developers, and leaves them with the feeling that Java is too prickly about what can go wrong. To change all that, you can use an integrated development environment (IDE), which will not only catch errors before you try to compile, but also suggest solutions. Java is badly in need of a good IDE, and a number of candidates are available, but the premiere Java IDE these days is Eclipse.

 

Open Source IDE:

If you closely follow open source or Java programming, you should have heard the buzz about Eclipse. Eclipse is an extensible software development environment comprising an IDE (Integrated development environment – It is an all-in-one tool for writing, editing, compiling, and running programs) and a plug-in system to extend it. 
 
It is written primarily in Java and can be used to develop applications in Java. And by means of various plug-ins, it can be used to develop applications in other languages as well, including C, C++, COBOL, Python, Perl, PHP, and others. Eclipse employs plug-ins in order to provide all of its functionality on top of (and including) the runtime system. The runtime system of Eclipse is based on Equinox – an OSGi standard compliant implementation.

 

Plugin Extension in Eclipse IDE: Read more…