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Posts Tagged ‘Eclipse’

SpringSource Tool Suite

November 24, 2009 Leave a comment

 

What is SpringSource Tool Suite (STS)?

SpringSource Tool Suite has been a much awaited release from Spring Source. Interface21 (builders of Spring Framework) had partnered with Tasktop Technologies (builders of Eclipse Mylyn) to develop Spring Tool Suite, with the goal of reducing complexity in Java development and maintenance.  Mylyn is an open source Eclipse project (task-focused UI for Eclipse that reduces information overload and makes multi-tasking easy) while Spring is a popular open source framework for enterprise Java.  Built on Eclipse and Mylyn, Spring Tool Suite simplifies the large aggregation of tools used to develop complex enterprise Java applications.

This suite includes Spring IDE, the AspectJ Development Tools (AJDT), AspectJ, and Mylyn to create a task-focused approach to the development of Spring-powered enterprise applications. When Integrated development environments (IDEs) are used for large enterprise applications, they flood developers with tens of thousands of artifacts, wasting productive time by forcing developers to constantly find and identify the information relevant to the task at hand. In addition, the enterprise developer’s IDE consists of many tools that do not provide a unified workflow. While the Spring Framework and Portfolio projects already integrate many key technologies at the framework and library level, there is currently no tool solution that provides Mylyn’s task focus, tool integration, and workflow streamlining benefits to enterprise application developers. Building on the existing success of Eclipse, Mylyn and Spring IDE, the Spring Tool Suite will simplify the complexity dramtically.

 

Spring Source Quotes: 

SpringSource Tool Suite™ (STS) provides the best Eclipse-powered development environment for building Spring-powered enterprise applications. STS includes tools for all of the latest enterprise Java and Spring based technologies as well as the most advanced tooling available for enterprise OSGi development. STS supports application targeting to local, virtual and cloud-based servers and provides built in support for SpringSource dm Server and tc Server. SpringSource Tool Suite is freely available for development and internal business operations use with no time limits.

 

What’s available in STS? Read more…

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Eclipse IDE Primer

September 13, 2009 Leave a comment

 

 

eclipse

 

 

Eclipse Origin:

In November 2001, IBM released $40 million worth of software tools into the public domain. Starting with this collection of tools, several organizations created a consortium of IDE providers. They called this consortium the Eclipse Foundation, Inc. Eclipse was to be “a universal tool platform — an open extensible IDE for anything and nothing in particular.” This talk about “anything and nothing in particular” reflects Eclipse’s ingenious plug-in architecture.

The initial codebase originated from VisualAge. In its default form it is meant for Java developers, consisting of the Java Development Tools (JDT). Users can extend its capabilities by installing plug-ins written for the Eclipse software framework, such as development toolkits for other programming languages, and can write and contribute their own plug-in modules. Language packs provide translations into over a dozen natural languages.

Released under the terms of the Eclipse Public License, Eclipse is free and open source software. Eclipse began as an IBM Canada project. It was developed by OTI (Object Technology International) as a Java based replacement for the Smalltalk based  VisualAge family of IDE products, which itself had been developed by OTI. In January 2004, the Eclipse Foundation was created. The Eclipse Foundation turned itself from an industry consortium to an independent not-for-profit organization. Among other things, this meant having an Executive Director — Mike Milinkovich, formerly of Oracle Corporation. Apparently, Milinkovich is the Eclipse Foundation’s only paid employee. Everybody else donates his or her time to create Eclipse — the world’s most popular Java development environment. According to IBM Chief Technology Officer Lee Nackman, the name “Eclipse” was chosen to target Microsoft’s Visual Studio product.

 

Eclipse Introduction:

 Eclipse is an open source, extensible, multi-language software development environment, comprising an IDE (Integrated development environment), and a plug-in system to extend it. At its heart, Eclipse isn’t only a Java development environment. Eclipse is a vessel — a holder for a bunch of add-ons that form, a Java, C++, or even a COBOL development environment. Each add-on is called a plug-in, and the Eclipse that you normally use is composed of more than 80 useful plug-ins. While the Eclipse Foundation was shifting into high gear, several other things were happening in the world of integrated development environments. IBM was building WebSphere Studio Application Developer (WSAD) — a big Java development environment based on Eclipse. And Sun Microsystems was promoting NetBeans. Like Eclipse, NetBeans is a set of building blocks for creating Java development environments. But unlike Eclipse, NetBeans is pure Java. So a few years ago, war broke out between Eclipse people and NetBeans people. And the war continues to this day.

 

 

Eclipse Architecture: Read more…

Why Eclipse IDE?

September 13, 2009 Leave a comment

 

 

If you’re reading this, you’re most likely a Java programmer, and you know how finicky Java can be at times. Missed import statements, forgotten variable declarations, omitted semicolons, garbled syntax, typos—all these problems will cause the Java command-line compiler, javac, to cough and display pages of annoying error messages. The error messages tell you that javac knows what the error is but doesn’t fix the problem. javac can’t fix the problem as it isn’t an editor. That makes long streams of errors scrolling off the page an all-too-common experience for Java developers, and leaves them with the feeling that Java is too prickly about what can go wrong. To change all that, you can use an integrated development environment (IDE), which will not only catch errors before you try to compile, but also suggest solutions. Java is badly in need of a good IDE, and a number of candidates are available, but the premiere Java IDE these days is Eclipse.

 

Open Source IDE:

If you closely follow open source or Java programming, you should have heard the buzz about Eclipse. Eclipse is an extensible software development environment comprising an IDE (Integrated development environment – It is an all-in-one tool for writing, editing, compiling, and running programs) and a plug-in system to extend it. 
 
It is written primarily in Java and can be used to develop applications in Java. And by means of various plug-ins, it can be used to develop applications in other languages as well, including C, C++, COBOL, Python, Perl, PHP, and others. Eclipse employs plug-ins in order to provide all of its functionality on top of (and including) the runtime system. The runtime system of Eclipse is based on Equinox – an OSGi standard compliant implementation.

 

Plugin Extension in Eclipse IDE: Read more…

Eclipse IDE Installation & Configuration

August 24, 2009 2 comments

 

 

At the time of this post, the latest Eclipse package version available to download is Eclipse 3.5.0. Eclipse releases are named after the moons of Jupiter, and each denotes a successive release. For Ex, Galileo is 3.5 which is the latest version, previous versions are Eclipse Ganymede which is Eclipse Version 3.4.0, and Eclipse Europa which is Eclipse Version 3.3.0. Eclipse is free for downloading. All you have to do is navigate to http://www.eclipse.org/downloads , chose and download the Eclipse package suitable for your requirements from one of the download mirrors available, such as:

  • Eclipse Classic 3.5.0 (The classic Eclipse download includes the Eclipse Platform, Java Development Tools, and Plug-in Development Environment, including source and both user and programmer documentation.)
  • Eclipse IDE for Java Developers (The essential tools for any Java developer, including a Java IDE, a CVS client, XML Editor and Mylyn)
  • Eclipse IDE for Java EE Developers (If you want to develop web applications, you should download Eclipse IDE for Java EE DevelopersTools for Java developers creating Java EE and Web applications, including a Java IDE, tools for Java EE, JPA, JSF, Mylyn and others.)
  • Eclipse packages for PHP, C/C++ Developers, etc.

 

 

Since Eclipse is a Java program, you will need to have Java installed on your computer to run Eclipse [Refer to Java Installation & Configuration post for details]. Eclipse can run on a number of Java Virtual Machines. Eclipse officially recommends Java version 5 (also known as 1.5), although many Eclipse users use the newer version 6 (1.6).

Sun’s Java is available in two main distributions: the Java Runtime Engine (JRE) and the Java Development Kit (JDK). If you are using Eclipse for Java development, the JDK offers several advantages, including the availability of source code for the Java classes. If you are using Eclipse for something other than Java development, the JRE is all you need. Once you have a Java VM installed, you’re ready to work with Eclipse.

 

Download Instructions:  Read more…