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Archive for the ‘Eclipse IDE’ Category

Eclipse IDE Workbench, Editing, Ant, Help Tips & Tricks

November 26, 2009 Leave a comment

 

Eclipse IDE Workbench, Editing, Ant,  Help Tips & Tricks:

 

In continuation to the previous post, this one has Tips & Tricks for Views in Eclipse IDE. Refer to posts in Eclipse Tips & Tricks for others.   

 

Note: If the image displayed below is unclear, then click on the image.  Then hover over the image in the newly opened window. You will get a zoom icon, click the image with it and it will be displayed with better visibility. Read more…

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Eclipse IDE Miscellaneous & Debugging Tips & Tricks

November 26, 2009 Leave a comment

 

Eclipse IDE Productivity Tips & Tricks – Miscellaneous & Debugging:

 

In continuation to the previous post, this one has Tips & Tricks for Views in Eclipse IDE. Refer to posts in Eclipse Tips & Tricks for others.   

 

Note: If the image displayed below is unclear, then click on the image.  Then hover over the image in the newly opened window. You will get a zoom icon, click the image with it and it will be displayed with better visibility. Read more…

Eclipse IDE Views Tips & Tricks

November 25, 2009 Leave a comment

  

Eclipse IDE Productivity Tips & Tricks – Viewing:

 

In continuation to the previous post, this one has Tips & Tricks for Views in Eclipse IDE. Refer to posts in Eclipse Tips & Tricks for others.   

 

Note: If the image displayed below is unclear, then click on the image.  Then hover over the image in the newly opened window. You will get a zoom icon, click the image with it and it will be displayed with better visibility. Read more…

Eclipse IDE Refactoring, Searching & Navigating Trips & Tricks

November 25, 2009 Leave a comment

 

Eclipse IDE Productivity Tips & Tricks – Refactoring, Searching & Navigating:

 

In continuation to the previous post, this one has Tips & Tricks for Refactoring, Searching & Navigating in Eclipse IDE. Refer to posts in Eclipse Tips & Tricks for others.  

 

Note: If the image displayed below is unclear, then click on the image.  Then hover over the image in the newly opened window. You will get a zoom icon, click the image with it and it will be displayed with better visibility. Read more…

Eclipse IDE Editing Source Trips & Tricks

November 25, 2009 1 comment

 

Eclipse IDE Productivity Tips & Tricks – Editing Source:

Okay, we might know about few or most of these from everywhere, also might already have this list handy as this comes straight out of Eclipse help tutorial. But I am posting here so that this can be available anytime on the move. The following tips and tricks give some helpful ideas for increasing productivity while working on Eclipse IDE. These tips & tricks can be grouped into 7 main categories namely:

  1. Editing
  2. Refactoring
  3. Navigation
  4. Searching
  5. Views
  6. Miscellaneous
  7. Debugging

This post has Editing Source Tips & Tricks. Refer to posts in Eclipse Tips & Tricks for others. Read more…

Eclipse IDE Primer

September 13, 2009 Leave a comment

 

 

eclipse

 

 

Eclipse Origin:

In November 2001, IBM released $40 million worth of software tools into the public domain. Starting with this collection of tools, several organizations created a consortium of IDE providers. They called this consortium the Eclipse Foundation, Inc. Eclipse was to be “a universal tool platform — an open extensible IDE for anything and nothing in particular.” This talk about “anything and nothing in particular” reflects Eclipse’s ingenious plug-in architecture.

The initial codebase originated from VisualAge. In its default form it is meant for Java developers, consisting of the Java Development Tools (JDT). Users can extend its capabilities by installing plug-ins written for the Eclipse software framework, such as development toolkits for other programming languages, and can write and contribute their own plug-in modules. Language packs provide translations into over a dozen natural languages.

Released under the terms of the Eclipse Public License, Eclipse is free and open source software. Eclipse began as an IBM Canada project. It was developed by OTI (Object Technology International) as a Java based replacement for the Smalltalk based  VisualAge family of IDE products, which itself had been developed by OTI. In January 2004, the Eclipse Foundation was created. The Eclipse Foundation turned itself from an industry consortium to an independent not-for-profit organization. Among other things, this meant having an Executive Director — Mike Milinkovich, formerly of Oracle Corporation. Apparently, Milinkovich is the Eclipse Foundation’s only paid employee. Everybody else donates his or her time to create Eclipse — the world’s most popular Java development environment. According to IBM Chief Technology Officer Lee Nackman, the name “Eclipse” was chosen to target Microsoft’s Visual Studio product.

 

Eclipse Introduction:

 Eclipse is an open source, extensible, multi-language software development environment, comprising an IDE (Integrated development environment), and a plug-in system to extend it. At its heart, Eclipse isn’t only a Java development environment. Eclipse is a vessel — a holder for a bunch of add-ons that form, a Java, C++, or even a COBOL development environment. Each add-on is called a plug-in, and the Eclipse that you normally use is composed of more than 80 useful plug-ins. While the Eclipse Foundation was shifting into high gear, several other things were happening in the world of integrated development environments. IBM was building WebSphere Studio Application Developer (WSAD) — a big Java development environment based on Eclipse. And Sun Microsystems was promoting NetBeans. Like Eclipse, NetBeans is a set of building blocks for creating Java development environments. But unlike Eclipse, NetBeans is pure Java. So a few years ago, war broke out between Eclipse people and NetBeans people. And the war continues to this day.

 

 

Eclipse Architecture: Read more…

Why Eclipse IDE?

September 13, 2009 Leave a comment

 

 

If you’re reading this, you’re most likely a Java programmer, and you know how finicky Java can be at times. Missed import statements, forgotten variable declarations, omitted semicolons, garbled syntax, typos—all these problems will cause the Java command-line compiler, javac, to cough and display pages of annoying error messages. The error messages tell you that javac knows what the error is but doesn’t fix the problem. javac can’t fix the problem as it isn’t an editor. That makes long streams of errors scrolling off the page an all-too-common experience for Java developers, and leaves them with the feeling that Java is too prickly about what can go wrong. To change all that, you can use an integrated development environment (IDE), which will not only catch errors before you try to compile, but also suggest solutions. Java is badly in need of a good IDE, and a number of candidates are available, but the premiere Java IDE these days is Eclipse.

 

Open Source IDE:

If you closely follow open source or Java programming, you should have heard the buzz about Eclipse. Eclipse is an extensible software development environment comprising an IDE (Integrated development environment – It is an all-in-one tool for writing, editing, compiling, and running programs) and a plug-in system to extend it. 
 
It is written primarily in Java and can be used to develop applications in Java. And by means of various plug-ins, it can be used to develop applications in other languages as well, including C, C++, COBOL, Python, Perl, PHP, and others. Eclipse employs plug-ins in order to provide all of its functionality on top of (and including) the runtime system. The runtime system of Eclipse is based on Equinox – an OSGi standard compliant implementation.

 

Plugin Extension in Eclipse IDE: Read more…